American originals don't come more original than Chuck Yeager. Even for those whose parents weren't born when he was rewriting the aviation record books, the name rings a bell. Wasn't he the guy who first smashed the sound barrier – something to do with Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff? He was...
When Chuck Yeager proved humans could fly faster than the speed of sound, he emphasized his point by generating a boom so loud over the Mojave Desert that no one on the ground that October day in 1947 could doubt his achievement.
Charleston’s Yeager Airport and the West Virginia Air Guard will celebrate their 70th anniversary with an air show Sept. 30-Oct. 1, featuring flying demonstrations, aircraft displays and tours, and rides aboard World War II-era aircraft. Known as Kanawha Airport when it opened in 1947, after three years of earth-moving work,...
Me-109
The 357th Fighter Group shipped out for Europe in winter of 1943-44, and began operations in February, 1944. Assigned to the first P-51 equipped unit in the Eighth Air Force, Yeager shot down his first aircraft, a MesserschmittME-109 on his seventh mission (one of the early Mustang missions over...
Meet Andy Green, Who Broke The Sound Barrier In A Car And Plans To Go 1,000 MPH Later This Year As Andy Green prepares to hit 1,000 mph in his Bloodhound SSC jet/rocket car in South Africa later this year, we thought now would be a good time to reminisce...
Slide inside the cockpit with this gallery of the famous "Glamorous Glennis" Bell X-1 rocket plane that first broke the sound barrier. Most of us are familiar with the bright orange, bullet-shaped Bell X-1 rocketship that legendary test pilot Chuck...
On October 14, 1947, a test pilot with the right stuff changed the future of aviation forever. The joke was on me. It was just after sunup on the morning of Oct. 14, 1947, and as I walked into the hangar at Muroc Army Air Base in the California high desert,...
During the early days of testing for the legendary SR-71 Blackbird there were some harrowing mishaps, the details of which have rarely come to light. On January 25, 1966, test pilot Bill Weaver and Lockheed flight test reconnaissance and navigation systems specialist Jim Zwayer experienced their plane vanishing around them...
Chuck Yeager in 1948. The previous year, he became the first pilot to break the sound barrier when he reached a speed of 700 miles per hour in a Bell Aircraft X-1.Credit...Associated Press
yeager smithsonian
Source: National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution Charles "Chuck" Yeager stopped by the Museum last Friday to visit with the Bell X-1, the airplane in which he broke the sound barrier 68 years ago last month.